Search For:

Share This

No Title 1768


Rural broadband resource

Guest Opinion: Identity theft reaches from cradle to grave

We’ll need more electricity

New York from Walker

Lincoln Theater date correction

Co-op Postcard: Greening the forest


Rural broadband resource
The Federal Communications Commission has partnered with the U.S. Department of Agriculture to launch an Internet site to promote the deployment of broadband services to rural communities. The site, available at http://wireless.fcc.gov (click on “Broadband Opportunities for Rural America”), provides information on different technology platforms used to provide broadband service, how to access spectrum necessary for delivery of wireless broadband services, government funding for broadband services, relevant FCC and USDA proceedings and initiatives, and data on broadband deployment. In addition, the site provides instructions on how to locate companies already licensed to provide wireless services in or near specific rural communities, as well as links to other government and private resources related to encouraging broadband opportunities in rural America.
Back to Top



Guest Opinion: Identity theft reaches from cradle to grave
Identity theft can happen to anyone, from a newborn child to someone who’s passed away.

If your credit card is stolen, you’re at risk for an “account takeover.” The thief uses your credit account information to purchase products and services with either the actual credit card or simply the account number and expiration date.

When your name or Social Security number is stolen, you can become the victim of “true name fraud.” The thief uses your Social Security number and other identifying information to open new accounts in your name, usually without your knowledge.

How can you prevent or reduce the possibility of identity theft happening to you? Here are some basic tips:

• Don’t carry more than one credit card with you during your daily activities.

• Report the loss or theft of any credit cards to the issuers immediately.

• Avoid using your debit card for online purchases—your credit card is better protected against fraud. (If your credit card is used without your authorization and you’ve reported the theft, you’re only responsible for the first $50 in charges.) Check with your card’s issuing bank to find out what kind of protection you may have.

• Install and update virus protection software and install a firewall on your home computer if you use the Web at home.

• Keep photocopies of your credit cards, debit card, and driver’s license in a secure place.

• Don’t give out personal information such as credit card numbers over the phone, unless you have initiated the phone call to a trusted company.

• Avoid throwing away your receipts in public trash containers; shred receipts that show your entire account number on paper.

• Check your mailbox regularly if you’re expecting a new credit card.

• Check your credit report at least once a year.

As far as your Social Security number is concerned, you should never have it written on your checks or printed on your driver’s license. Also avoid carrying your Social Security card in your wallet—if you lose your wallet, anyone can use the number.

Federal law gives you the right to one free credit report each year from the three credit bureaus: Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion. You can order a free annual credit report by calling (877) 322-8228 or visiting www.annualcreditreport.com.

—National Rural Electric Cooperative Association

Back to Top



We’ll need more electricity
The United States is going to need more electricity in the next 10 years. While our use of electricity will rise by about 100,000 megawatts in the coming decade, new electric capacity will not keep up that pace. The result will be a narrowing of the cushion that helps protect our electricity supply from power plants closing for routine maintenance, a large storm, or other unexpected disruption. In other words, a lot of electric generating plants will need to be built, along with adding more sources of renewable energy, and greater energy efficiency. Experts predict adding this new generating capacity will be costly, and will be a factor in increasing the cost of electricity in the next 10 to 20 years, in order to assure reliable electricity. For a more detailed explanation read The Future of Electricity column, “The importance of electricity reserves,” in the May 2007 Kentucky Living. You can find that online by going to the Web site www.KentuckyLiving.com, typing “electricity reserves” in the Article Search box, clicking “Go,” then clicking on the article link. Chart source: North American Electric Reliability Corporation 10-year forecast, October 2007, pp 10-11
Back to Top



New York from Walker
Noted Kentucky author Frank X Walker’s When Winter Come, the Ascension of York is a sequel to the award-winning Buffalo Dance: the Journey of York. Written as historical fiction in poetic form, both books center around York, the slave of William Clark who took part in the Lewis and Clark Expedition. The poems are written from the point of view of 13 voices, including York’s wives, William Clark, and even York’s hunting shirt. The poems explore issues such as the disregard the expedition party had for the native populations it encountered, Lewis’ odd behavior, and Clark’s unwillingness to accept York’s humanity. The book is published by The University Press of Kentucky.
Back to Top



Lincoln Theater date correction
We listed an incorrect opening date for the Kentucky Repertory Theater’s Abraham Lincoln, in the state celebrations on page 44 of the January issue. Following are the dates for the Lincoln plays in the theater in Horse Cave:

One Man’s Lincoln
By Wade Hall
June 20 – August 2, 2008

Abraham Lincoln
Adapted by Robert Brock from a play by John Drinkwater
August 22 – November 1, 2008

With Malice Toward None
By Robert Brock
June 2009

The Kentucky Repertory Theater also offers touring performances. For more information, phone the theater office at (270) 786-2177.

Back to Top



Co-op Postcard: Greening the forest

Back to Top


Don't Leave! Sign up for Kentucky Living updates ...
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.