Share This

Recipes From Horse Country, New Photo Contest


Recipes from history and horse country

Energy tip

Land conservation help available

Time Capsule: 50 years ago in Kentucky Living

A soda fountain for Midway

Train show

Quote: Seymour M. Hersh

Ski champ

Enter the photo contest


Recipes from history and horse country

If you’ve ever strolled through a historic neighborhood and wondered what life was like in the grand old homes of a bygone era, Louisville author David Domine invites you to experience it in A Feast for the Eyes: Recipes from America’s Grandest Victorian Neighborhood (McClanahan Publishing House, $24.95). Domine gathered original recipes from more than 30 Old Louisville homeowners and entertainers and paired them with full-color photography of the mansions themselves, capturing architectural details both inside and out and sharing the history that lies within.

Perhaps the old family comfort food recipes such as Great Aunt Rose’s Chicken, which contributor Kim Mowder says her great-aunt created just after the invention of Velveeta, will be your favorites. Maybe you will prefer something a bit more upscale to show off at your next dinner party such as Deviled Eggs with Red Caviar or a Bourbon Slush. Either way, the choices are varied and abundant while getting a lovely armchair tour of the homes featured. Contact information is included for those homes offering guided tours or hospitality accommodations.

For a different taste of Kentucky, Kathy Mayfield and Suzy Smith offer a sampling of horse country in the Sterling Bits (McClanahan Publishing House, $19.95) cookbook and sketchbook. Seasonal menus offer suggestions for more formal equestrian entertaining down to the casual get-together. The authors also educate their readers in horse life etiquette, the four Kentucky equestrian seasons, and offer information on major equestrian destinations and events in our state. Smith’s equestrian-themed sketches are peppered throughout, adding a personalized feel to the book.

As evidenced by these two new collections of Kentucky’s culinary delights, Mayfield and Smith claim, “Bluegrass air is the freshest, Bluegrass horses are the swiftest, and Bluegrass cooking is the finest.”

Penny Woods for Joseph-Beth booksellers, pennymouse1@yahoo.com,(800) 248-6849, www.josephbeth.com.

Back to Top



Energy tip

Feel around doors and windows for airflow. Adding weatherstripping or caulk around a leaky door or window can lower energy bills by keeping your heating system from working too hard to compensate for air leaving your home.

Back to Top



Land conservation help available

Steve McMillen, wildlife biologist for the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, reminds us about federal and state programs for conservation-minded landowners/farmers. A good choice for future dry summers might include a Native Grass Hay and/or Pasture Renovation for 2011.

The Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQUIP) gives financial and technical assistance to implement structural and management conservation practices to optimize environmental benefits on working agricultural land.

The Wildlife Habitat Incentive Program (WHIP) assists with those who want to develop aquatic or terrestrial wildlife habitats.

For more information, contact the local Natural Resources Conservation District Conservationist office or Kentucky Dep. of Fish and Wildlife Resources EQUIP and WHIP info at www.ky.nrcs.usda.gov/programs or www.fw.ky.gov.

Back to Top



Time Capsule: 50 years ago in Kentucky Living

Cooperative Uses Helicopter To “Plant” Utility Poles Across Rugged Countryside

A rural electric cooperative in northeastern Kentucky recently telescoped a 60-day construction job into a 2-day operation while marking up a basic saving of $2,425.

The construction crew of Grayson RECC, aided by a helicopter, erected 16 utility poles over a distance of 10 miles in setting up a transmission line from Newfoundland substation in Elliott County to the new substation being built at Mazie in Lawrence County.

Hobart C. Adams, manager of the cooperative, said that carrying the poles overland would have required 60 days at a cost of $10,000. The big Sikorsky 58 helicopter lowered 87 poles into position on the first day of the operation and completed the job on the second day. Total cost to the cooperative for the helicopter service was $7,575.

The helicopter carried the poles, some of which were 75 feet long and weighed 3,000 pounds, over hills and valleys to deposit them in holes with the help of workmen on the ground.

Back to Top



A soda fountain for Midway

After more than 13 years without a local prescription service for its 1,600 residents, Midway now has a drugstore with a fun bonus. Midway residents Ken and Amanda Glass opened the Railroad Drug and Old Time Soda Fountain this summer. The store offers a full-service pharmacy, sundries, greeting cards, plus a service novel to modern Midway—an old-time soda fountain, shown here. Customers can perch on a stool at the counter or slide into a booth to enjoy a shake, cone, sundae, or many other ice cream treats. The store is open Monday-Saturday. Visit its Web site at www.railroaddrug.com.

Back to Top



Train show

Many childhood memories have visions of “choo choo” trains whether you’ve stepped foot on one or not. If there’s a railway enthusiast in your family, Kentucky’s Community Arts Center in Danville is a “go to” destination this January/February. You’ll find plenty of train collections, railway folklore, and railroad history. Related activities include a train photography exhibit, Interactive Art Stations where you can create boxcar graffiti, shovel coal, learn about hobo culture, and hear stories of railway legends John Henry and Casey Jones. There will be guided tours, guest appearances by 92-year-old retired train conductor Chauncey Love, and a gift shop stocked with trains and railroad related items. Price: adults $6, children $4, seniors $5, field trips $3. Open to the public January 5-February 27. For more information, contact Jenny Jacoby at (859) 236-7993 or jenny@communityartscenter.net.

Back to Top



Quote: Seymour M. Hersh

“…the cartoonish view that a hacker pressing a button could cause the lights to go out across the country is simply wrong. There is no national power grid in the United States. There are more than a hundred publicly and privately owned power companies that operate their own lines, with separate computer systems and separate security arrangements…Decentralization, which alarms security experts…can also protect networks.”

Seymour M. Hersh, “The Online Threat—Should we be worried about a cyber war?” in The New Yorker

Back to Top



Ski champ

Suzanne Webb of Leitchfield won first place in the slalom event in the women’s age 60-64 division at the National Water Ski Championships in Wilmington, Illinois. She also placed third in the trick ski event in which competitors use one ski while completing 180- and 360-degree spins. She has skied competitively for only five years.

A skier since age 9, Suzanne lives in Grayson County on Rough River Lake with husband Mark. Suzanne says they ski almost every day.

Nearly 800 water ski athletes from across the United States competed for national titles in slalom, tricks, jumping, and overall in respective age divisions during the seven-day tournament.

Back to Top



Enter the photo contest

If you think you could be a prizewinning photographer, find out by entering the 2011 Kentucky Living photo contest. Enter online by going to www.KentuckyLiving.com and clicking on Photo Contest. Deadline is March 15. Entry forms will also appear in the February and March issues of Kentucky Living. Winners will be published in the July issue.

We will choose a total of 28 winners from nine categories: Children; Teens & Adults; Home/Family; Wildlife; Pets; Scenic; Sports/Action; Fireworks; and Miscellaneous. One overall winner will receive $200, first place in each category will receive $100, second and third places in each category will receive $50 each.

Back to Top

Share This
Don't Leave! Sign up for Kentucky Living updates ...
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.