Search For:

Share This

No Title 2484


What if Mary kept a diary?

Quote: North American Electric Reliability Corp.

Energy Tip

Big Lights

Large Lincoln

Time Capsule: 50 Years Ago in Kentucky Living

Caring for the pets back home

Good games

Energy scam alert

Farms shine bright


What if Mary kept a diary?

During this season, Christians focus on the birth of Jesus. How often, though, does one think about what Jesus might have been like as a child going through all the typical developmental stages, or on the thoughts and feelings that his mother Mary must have experienced as she watched him grow? As Frankfort author Mary Bailey listened to her pastor teach about Mary and Joseph, she pondered these very things. An idea was born to tell Mary’s story in the form of a mother’s journal. Jesus My Son: Mary’s Journal of Jesus’ Early Life (AuthorHouse, $14.99) is a collection of entries written from Mary’s point of view, beginning with her engagement to Joseph until just before Jesus began his ministry.

So how does one assume the voice of a young woman who lived so long ago? Bailey responds, “Research, research, research. I also applied milestones that happened to my own children and grandchildren…to Jesus’ life. During His life, Jesus said a first word, took a first step, lost a first tooth, started to school, graduated from school, ran a race. Any milestone that actually happened in my life, I researched how the Jews during Jesus’ time would have celebrated. I thought of every milestone we celebrated and let Mary write an entry about it. When my great-niece got her license, I got carried away and started writing about Jesus getting his license until I realized he didn’t need a license to drive the donkey.”

Bailey’s writing had a huge impact on her own faith. “Realizing that Jesus was a toddler, a little boy, a teenager, and young adult, makes me feel the pain that Mary must have felt when her little boy was sacrificed for someone like me. When I think of Jesus now, I see a toddler running through a field of flowers holding his mother’s hand. When I take communion, I feel those nails being driven into a little baby’s hands and feet,” Bailey says. She hopes that just as God had a plan for Mary, that her readers will realize God’s plan and blessings for their own lives.

Bailey is currently writing two more volumes of journal entries that will cover Mary’s view of Jesus’ ministry and of Jesus’ death and resurrection.

Penny Woods for Joseph-Beth booksellers, pennymouse1@yahoo.com,(800) 248-6849, www.josephbeth.com.

Back to Top



Quote: North American Electric Reliability Corp.

“The electric industry has adequate plans for 2010-2019 to provide reliable electric service across North America.”

2010 Long-Term Reliability Assessment by the North American Electric Reliability Corp.

Back to Top



Energy Tip

When decorating, remember that outdoor “icicle” lights use more energy because they have more bulbs per foot than regular strands. Consider using regular strands of energy-saving LED (Light Emitting Diode) lights. They use less electricity and last up to 100,000 hours indoors.

Back to Top



Big Lights

Santa’s Midnight Flight over the world is part of KaLightoscope The Attraction, a “walk-through” landscape of lighted holiday sculptures that can be experienced for the first time in the U.S. as part of KaLightoscope Christmas at the Galt House Hotel in Louisville until Jan. 3, 2011. A collection of larger-than-life holiday sculptures, made of sheer, hand-painted fabrics (some as high as 24 feet), are enhanced by light and color. A gingerbread castle adorns one of the world’s largest edible gingerbread villages in KaLightoscope Christmas. In addition, numerous areas within the hotel offer a variety of holiday events and activities, as well as shops filled with regional artisan items. The Mistletoe Marketplace and Gingerbread Village are free and admission to KaLightoscope The Attraction is from $14.95 to $17.95 per person depending on group size. For 4 years old and under, admission is free. For additional information, visit www.kalightoscope.com or phone (800) 775-7777.

Back to Top



Large Lincoln

The Floyd County town of Stanville is now home to the world’s second-largest seated statue of Abraham Lincoln. A replica of the largest statue in Washington, D.C., was commissioned by attorney Eric C. Conn. The purpose is to honor the first and only Kentuckian being elected to the presidency of the United States. School tours are already in progress and plans are under way for educational materials. The statue is located on U.S. Highway 23 and admission is free. For more info, contact Jamie Slone at (606) 424-5672.

Back to Top



Time Capsule: 50 Years Ago in Kentucky Living

Why not let security lights work for YOU?

Now that the days are short and nights are long we are seeing many opportunities for good outdoor lighting. As we drive around the state we notice many farmsteads have installed the new photo electrically controlled security lights. These new installations are very similar to street lights in town which for many years have added to the beauty of the town and discouraged prowlers from breaking and entering.

The development of the electric controls which operate these lights has been improved to the point of giving satisfactory service in rural areas. The control operates the lights automatically, turning them on when it gets dark and off again when it gets daylight. This feature also makes the light more attractive to farm people, inasmuch as it is completely automatic. There is no concern about being out late and worrying about the lights not being on back home.

One of the greatest advantages of good lighting is that it makes it possible for the farm operator to perform his tasks much better without the danger of walking into unseen objects or falling over them.

Back to Top



Caring for the pets back home

Have you ever wondered what military men and women do with their pets when deployed overseas? Guardian Angels for Soldier’s Pet (www.guardianangelsforsoldierspet.com), a national organization, did, and they’ve placed hundreds in foster homes. When Miché Branscum of Lawrenceburg heard of the need, she agreed to become a Kentucky state contact. “I’m the community outreach liaison and Kentucky’s in great need of foster homes because of the surge in troops coming out of Ft. Campbell and Fort Knox.” Branscum is hoping to find people to head up other regions of the state. “Not only are more homes needed, we need people to do administrative work, like inspecting prospective homes, mailing pictures/videos to those deployed, and to collect donations for things like veterinary assistance when needed.” Branscum can be contacted at gasp.outreach.ky@gmail.com or (606) 305-8982.

Back to Top



Good games

By the closing day of the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games, total attendance topped half a million.

“We are incredibly pleased with the number of spectators who joined us at the Games over the 16 days,” says World Games 2010 Foundation CEO Jamie Link. “We are overwhelmed with the positive comments and remarks we have received about their experiences on the park, viewing competition, and with our volunteers.”

Daily attendance totals averaged from 25,000 to 35,000 throughout the event. Attendance was bolstered by several sold-out rounds of competition, including reining, vaulting, and dressage and para-dressage sessions.

Back to Top



Energy scam alert

If you’re thinking of taking advantage of a great-sounding energy saving offer for a box costing a few hundred dollars that promises to cut your electricity bill by 30 percent, don’t do it.

Engineers who have studied the devices, generally sold through the Internet, say the actual reduction is in the range of 0.06 to 0.23 percent. At that rate, it could take as long as 100 years for the device to pay for itself, according to a report published by the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.

The boxes contain a few dollars’ worth of energy storage devices that promise more efficient energy use by improving a home’s power factor. The engineers say power factor does not affect home electric bills in any significant way.

Although the engineers say the boxes don’t appear to be dangerous or illegal, energy saving investments would be much better spent adding insulation or more conventional efficiency improvements.

Kentucky Living reported on this and other energy scams in its November 2009 Energy 101 column. To read that, go to www.KentuckyLiving.com, type “XPower” in the Article Search box, and click “Go.”

Back to Top



Farms shine bright

Despite the struggling economic recovery, Kentucky agriculture remains a bright spot, according to a report in the Economic and Policy Update, published by the University of Kentucky’s College of Agriculture Cooperative Extension Service. A report in the September 24 newsletter says that net farm income this year will rise well above the 10-year average. The rebound is being led by improvements on the livestock side. Total cash receipts will be up $17 billion with higher prices in dairy, cattle, and hogs. A surge in corn prices also has a positive impact on total crop receipts. In recent years, Kentucky’s financial performance in agriculture has
mirrored the national trend.

Back to Top


Don't Leave! Sign up for Kentucky Living updates ...
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.