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Bucket trucks, a big birthday, and safety

Big toys
DANVILLE

Each year, Inter-County Energy Cooperative Corporation brings a bucket truck for children to explore during Big Toy Day. The fund-raiser benefits the Wilderness Trace

Bucket truck
Liam Hitchcock, son of Inter-County Energy Cooperative employee Dan Hitchcock, checks out the details on the co-op’s bucket truck during Big Toy Day, an annual fund-raising event for Wilderness Trace Child Development Center, while others don hardhats to climb into the bucket truck later in the day. Photo: Dan Hitchcock
Child Development Center, which provides educational and therapeutic services for children. Other local companies also set up big equipment such as fire engines and dump trucks, as well as Corvettes and motorcycles.

“The children are so excited to honk the horn on a fire truck and even blow the siren,” says Jim Jacobus, president and CEO of Inter-County Energy. “Inter-County proudly helps sponsor this event to brighten the lives of children who don’t normally have the opportunities many others experience. It certainly puts a smile on your face and tears in your eyes when you see the excitement on the children’s faces.”

65 years young
GRAYSON

Grayson RECC is celebrating 65 years of providing reliable and affordable electric service by giving away 2016 calendars featuring photos highlighting the co-op’s history.

Grayson RECC
Member Services Rep. Peggy Wells shows off the Grayson RECC calendar being given away to celebrate the co-op’s 65th anniversary. Photo: Julie Lewis
Grayson is Kentucky’s youngest electric cooperative. The co-op was formerly part of Fleming-Mason RECC and came into its own on October 13, 1950.

“It’s amazing that I have been employed here for 37 of our 65 years,” says Carol Ann Fraley, president and CEO of Grayson RECC, “and we have events planned throughout the year to celebrate our 65 years as a co-op.”

Avoiding hot, energized lines
PAINTSVILLE

David White, Kentucky Association of Electric Cooperatives safety instructor, uses a hot line trailer to demonstrate how to avoid power lines that could be on the ground or near the ground from storms and accidents. Photo: Denise Meyers
David White, Kentucky Association of Electric Cooperatives safety instructor, uses a hot line trailer to demonstrate how to avoid power lines that could be on the ground or near the ground from storms and accidents. Photo: Denise Meyers
“It is extremely important to conduct safety training with firemen because they encounter electrical fires and need specialized knowledge due to the volatile nature of such fires,” says David Estepp, president and general manager of Big Sandy Rural Electric Cooperative Corporation. Big Sandy RECC sponsors safety training for all local fire departments on a regular basis, often using a “hot line trailer” to enable viewers to see the effects of electric current.

Debra Gibson Isaacs from April 2016 Issue

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