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Careers, volunteers, and nostalgia

A United Way Co-op
April Burgess volunteers for Pay It Forward which Cumberland Presbyterian Church started to help families with supplies that are not covered by food stamps. Photo: Crystal Wilhite
April Burgess volunteers for Pay It Forward which Cumberland Presbyterian Church started to help families with supplies that are not covered by food stamps. Photo: Crystal Wilhite
DANVILLE

This year employees of Inter-County Energy Co-op once again participated in the annual Heart of Kentucky United Way Day of Action.
“In our annual campaign, 50 of our 63 employees contributed to the United Way at an average of $380 per employee,” says Jim Jacobus, Inter-County Energy Co-op president and CEO. “Not only do our employees put their money to work, but they also put their actions to work as well. Inter-County Energy has had a long-standing goal to be a ‘problem solver’ within the communities that we serve, and the annual Day of Action allows our employees the opportunity to do just that.”
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What linemen do
FLEMINGSBURG
High school FFA students Jeremy Jolly, Seth Ramey, and John Johnson explore career options while working on a simulated line construction with lineman Joey Porter. Photo: Bobby Pease
High school FFA students Jeremy Jolly, Seth Ramey, and John Johnson explore career options while working on a simulated line construction with lineman Joey Porter. Photo: Bobby Pease

High school Future Farmers of America seniors exploring careers got hands-on experience during several work days spent with linemen from Fleming-Mason Energy Cooperative.
“The students built a 7-0 pole tap, framed their pole, and strung conductor,” says Stephen Harn, operations superintendent for the cooperative. “They saw what all goes into a power line and went through an inspection. The final day they saw firsthand what happens when a power line blows.”
“The students took pride in their work, and I was impressed with them,” says Harn. “Several even talked to us about becoming an engineer.”
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Out of the darkness
ELIZABETHTOWN

Today, most of us take electricity for granted but two former members of Nolin Rural Electric Co-op remember when the lights first came on.

“You can’t imagine how much difference electricity made,” says Jack Scott in the new video. “It’s hard to even say because of the differences in how you could do things.”

“The most important lesson from electricity coming to Kentucky would be the story of how people worked together to make things happen because that is what the co-op is,” Alice Scott says.

In the video below, the Scott’s speak about electrification in rural Kentucky in the 1930’s:

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Debra Gibson Isaacs from February 2015 Issue[gap size=”1.313em”]

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